Tag: foodie

Soursop fruit is supreme


It’s not one of my staple fruits yet, but I’ve been hearing about the amazing benefits of soursop for a while. It’s also been doing the rounds on Instagram.

It wasn’t until a family friend was diagnosed with cancer, and a couple of years later my mother with the same disease that I started looking into this strange looking fruit.

Growing in tropical regions across Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Southeast Asia, the active ingredient annonaceous acetogenins, is said to hold all the power. Soursop’s highest claim to fame is that it cures cancer. Currently there is no medical/scientific evidence to prove this; and all claims are anecdotal.

According to Cancer Research UK, lab test have shown extracts of soursop killing certain types of breast and liver cancer cells. Tests have not been done in humans, so the charity does not endorse soursop as a treatment for cancer.

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Now the soursop power is in my hands! @ads_diaspora Instagram

I thank God that my mother’s cancer was detected early and removed. Our family friend, who has an advanced stage of cancer, was told by doctors he wouldn’t see 2015, but is still alive today. He drinks the dried, powdered leaves of the soursop fruit sent from Ghana. He hasn’t been ‘cured’ of the cancer, but he’s still here and strong enough to stand unaided for at least an hour which wasn’t possible during his latter courses of chemotherapy.

Hamamat’s video made me want to try soursop even more!

It’s not easy to find soursop in the UK and when you do it’s very expensive. It’s ironic because in Ghana, I’ve been told it’s not a fruit that’s revered much. Probably because in the tropics there are so many amazing fruits, soursop is just one of the bunch?

In tropical countries, the leaves of certain fruit and veg are used as food themselves or to preserve / aid in the cooking process. In addition to the anecdotal claims of fighting cancer, there are claims of various benefits of soursop leaves when eaten regularly, including fighting against arthritis, diabetes and gout, to name a few. When applied topically, it’s said to clear eczema, boils and blackheads.

I believe there are natural remedies which can help fight or even cure diseases and will start incorporating soursop into my diet from now on.

If you’ve tried it let me know what you think by commenting below.

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Pot & Platter is the food section of this blog –> A curation of what’s cooking in the African-Caribbean food scene: Cooked up in my blog pot and served on a platter.

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Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee Brownies


Jamaica is the 5th largest populated island in the Caribbean, with nearly 3 million people. The cool Blue Mountains, are famous for producing some of the world’s most sought after coffee!

The Blue Mountain coffee bean, comes from Arabica coffee plant. According to the Coffee Industry Board of Jamaica (CIBJ), at one point buyers were paying six times more for the Jamaican coffee bean than coffee from Latin America or Africa. But in times of global economic austerity, buyers are looking for a better deal especially their main buyer Japan, which imports around 75% of Jamaican coffee. Production of Blue Mountain Coffee goes through stringent quality assurance processes, to ensure its premium quality. To prove authenticity, the coffee needs to be certified by the CIBJ.

As tasty as it may be coffee isn’t just for drinking, and has been used in baking for decades. Try out this recipe for Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee Brownies from Bon Appetit , and let us know what you think by commenting below.

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Can’t go wrong with some yummy brownies. Photo credit: Bon Appétit

 

Ad+s Diaspora:

Snippets of an African legacy

Pot & Platter is the food section of this blog –> A curation of what’s cooking in the African-Caribbean food scene: Cooked up in our blog pot and served on a platter.

Twitter: @PotAndPlatter

Instagram:@potandplatter

www.facebook.com/adsdiaspora

INTERVIEW: Tokunbo’s Kitchen – Serving up a different kind of Supper Club


 

Come alone, leave with friends…My supper clubs have a networking vibe, if you come alone you won’t feel out of place. There are games, communal dining where you share a plate of food and get mingling, says Tokunbo – founder of Tokunbo’s Kitchen.

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Supper Club time! @tokunboskitchen

 

I came out of Angel tube station and immediately tapped in the address of the Starbucks where Tokunbo and I agreed to meet. I have the worst sense of direction and only had 10 minutes to get there, so I didn’t have time to get lost!

But by anxieties where unwarranted, the Starbucks was just across the road from the station and I was 5 minutes early. I bought a herbal tea and found a table. Notebook and pen ready, red record button on my iPhone begging to be pressed. I waited for ten minutes then Tokunbo rushes in flustered and apologetic for being late. Selfishly, it made me feel more at ease because I wasn’t late lol.  Anyway, after big smiles and greetings exchanged we got started…

African food is becoming more popular in the UK, why do you think this is?
Social media! Our generation isn’t shy about documenting their food experiences. People create hashtags like #jollofwars, giving African food publicity!

Why did Tokunbo’s Kitchen start?
My mum taught me to cook Nigerian food from a young age with the expectation that I’d be cooking for a family one day. I saw that you can do so much with it and wanted others to experience it. Friends always commented on my food and I’d spoken with a friend about getting into the street food business. So, I did it!

I love being in the kitchen, making things happen and the freedom of running my own business.

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Hitting the streets – @tokunboskitchen

I do everything myself, so creating a permanent team would help. The hardest part of running Tokunbo’s Kitchen is doing festivals and market stalls – I get around 5 hours sleep, cook, set up, on my feet all day, and do the washing up!

When did you start Tokunbo’s Kitchen?
In 2015 I went to a festival and queued for over an hour for jerk chicken! That’s when I thought I can definitely do this myself, and started Tokunbo’s Kitchen in September 2015.

What was your first Supper Club like?
At my first supper club, I served pounded yam in a communal setting, with a big bowl of Egusi stew (the same way you would get it in Lagos). That way people can try as much as they like. Many Nigerian dishes are vegan based and we cook with palm / coconut oil.

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Pounded yam and Egusi stew: @tokunboskitchen

Nigerian food is a burst of different flavours. I make a chilli sauce as a side, so people can add spice themselves – anyone can eat my food.

What do you think about ‘African fusion’ food?
It’s fine, but I also like to keep food authentic especially when introducing it to a new audience. My non-African customer base is increasing, so I wouldn’t stray too far from my roots. If I did I would lose what makes me special.

What’s Tokunbo’s Kitchen ethos?
Bringing people together through great food, giving them a taste of Nigeria.

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@tokunboskitchen

“When people are thinking about what to have for a takeaway I want them to think of Nigerian food and say ‘Let’s go to Tokunbo’s Kitchen and have some Jollof rice’”.

Have you eaten anything interesting lately?
The other day I had suya chicken and puff buns, it was like the Nigerian version of Chicken and Waffles. ‘Suya’ is the name of the popular beef snack but suya chicken is quite new in Nigerian cooking. The spice yaji used to make suya, is very versatile.

Most Popular dish of 2016 from Tokunbo’s Kitchen?
My Jollof, Ayamase stew (with green chili) cooked with palm oil and Iru (locust beans). Akara, which is black-eye bean fritters, was also quite popular last year.

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Jollof! Jollof! Jollof! @tokunboskitchen

What’s new in 2017?
There’s a lot in the works: A meal subscription service, more supper clubs, and pop-up venues across London. My first of the year will be at Craving Coffee on 3rd February, in Tottenham, London. I’m interested in doing a series of networking talks, on running a business, women empowerment and other topics, where of course there will be good food!

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No, those in the middle aren’t chunky chips…its fried yam! @tokunboskitchen

#OyaComeChop! Have a taste of Tokunbo’s Kitchen and keep up with all the food on social media!

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Nigerian food pop-ups in London


The African diaspora is a main contributor to the melting pot of one of the most famous cities in the world. However, the streets of London know little about Nigerian food – so a change is on the way!

See who else is making culinary waves in the UK capital!

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